Man points camera at ice – then captures the unimaginable on film




Photographer James Balog and his team were examining a glacier when their cameras caught something out of the ordinary.

The incident took place in Greenland, where James and his mates were gathering images from cameras that had been deployed around the Arctic Circle over the years.

James and his crew were looking for some good shots for an upcoming documentary, but no one was prepared for what would soon unfold in front of their eyes.

Even though American photographer James Balog specializes in nature photography, for a long time, he didn’t believe in climate change.

In fact, for nearly 20 years, he taunted scientists about global warming.

“I didn’t think that humans were capable of changing the basic physics and chemistry of this entire, huge planet. It didn’t seem probable, it didn’t seem possible,” Balog says.

It wasn’t until 2005 that Balog realized something was amiss while taking a close-up look at how climate changes affect nature.

During a National Geographic-commissioned photo expedition to the Arctic, he saw the enormous damage firsthand.

Exactly 10 years later, Balogs’ film “Chasing Ice” premiered, and he decided to document the melting of glaciers with an army of cameras.

And it was in this context that Balog caught one of the most spectacular scenes ever filmed.

In less than an hour and 15 minutes, Balog and his team and saw a piece of glacier the size of the Lower Manhattan fall into the ocean.

The historic event has been recorded in the Guinness Book of Records and clearly shows how serious the situation is for Earth’s climate.

As far as anyone knows, it was an unprecedented geological disaster. Unfortunately, though, it’s unlikely to be the last one of its kind.

Watch the powerful video here:

In November 2016, the Arctic was 20 degrees warmer than average, which is much warmer than even research models had predicted.

Unfortunately, we’re faced with disaster if we don’t zero our global greenhouse emissions by 2070. But on the positive side, we still have a chance to make that happen.

Hopefully, this video will help convince more people of how serious the situation is, so that together we can help to reverse the trend!

No one can do everything, but everyone can do something. Please share!




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LEAVE A COMMENT

  1. Anonymous says:

    WOW! Spent many years in Alaska and saw ice dogs, floating ice crystals and it got really cold sometimes. Saw many things involving ice and nature. But never anything that awesome and beautiful. Thanks for sharing AND explaining. Because I honestly thought you were going to say lights from town or something. But turned out to be a much more awesome thing.Thank you.

  2. Patty Arroyo says:

    Wonderful photos, thanks for sharing, and explaining, I live in the tropics, we have different kind of beauty here, but learning about this light pillars awesome !!!

  3. Emeline Donahue says:

    JUST MAGNIFICENT.

  4. Pam says:

    Wow! Thank you for the pictures and the explanation! Beautiful!

  5. Neil S. says:

    I live in Minnesota and have seen light pillars once in my 63 years. I wasn’t sure what I was seeing at the time. I did research the phenomena with success.

  6. Anthony Peratt says:

    Light Pillars are the Plato’s Pillars of Heracles, now misnamed Pillars of Hercules. They are Birkeland Currents (electron currents oriented South-North; Peratt, Springer, Physics of the Plasma Universe). These, not high mountain peaks guided sailors (and surveyors) at and before the time of the ancient Greeks.

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  8. Swagata says:

    At first I was mesmerised by the narration on the Dukha tribe. The fascinating lifestyle and the sacred bond with nature is so great. And then the photography is mind blowing. Beautiful indeed.

  9. Lorilyn says:

    Nice thanks for sharing those

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