Ring of Fire Solar Eclipse: Live Webcast




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On Tuesday, April 29 at 0517 GMT, the moon will begin to eclipse the sun in the first of two total solar eclipses set to happen this year. When the moon is directly between the sun and the Earth, only the edges of the sun will be visible, resembling a “ring of fire.”
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The best view of the eclipse will be a small D-shaped 500 km2 region in Antarctica, though a partial eclipse will be visible to many Australians. Those living in Perth will see about 55% of the sun eclipsed, while those in Sydney will see about 50%.

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Remember: staring at the sun is not a great idea. Trying to observe the eclipse through binoculars or a telescope without an appropriate solar filter will cause damage to the retina that cannot be fixed. Specialized solar eclipse glasses are available to make viewing the eclipse safer. If you don’t have time to get the proper protection, a pinhole camera can be used to view the eclipse safely. Punch a small hole into cardboard or heavy, dark paper and hold a piece of white paper under it. The eclipse will be nicely displayed, like this:
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Image credit: Eugene Kim

If you do not live in an area where the eclipse will be visible, you don’t have to miss out! The Slooh Space Camera will be providing a live webcast of the event, no special eyewear necessary!

Until then, check out this simulation of what the eclipse is expected to look like at its maximum.




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LEAVE A COMMENT

  1. Jene Wertz says:

    Love these! Are any for sale?

  2. Michelle says:

    Breathtaking! Love ❤ So very beautiful!!

  3. Anonymous says:

    in Michigan goes across the sky horizontally not vertically.

  4. Andrea says:

    Amazing photos.

  5. Anonymous says:

    I love how your click image is form #cosmos on Fox and you didn’t even bother to hide the watermark you used to make it look like the probe took the photos from IN the Jupiter atmosphere.

    • Cleo Cat says:

      yep, thought the same thing. pretty obvious, but still the article did surprisingly have some interesting details.

  6. Mark Bracken says:

    Beautiful.

  7. Marilyn Kinsella says:

    Learn something new everyday. Never heard of these – fascinating, beautiful, inspiring and downright awesome.

  8. Halina Biernacki says:

    Yes, these are stunning pic’s …. however, due to the development “doctoring” technology … how much of this is real?

  9. Lill ashakara says:

    Amazing, beautiful. Thank you, it made my day.

  10. Anonymous says:

    Thanks Miles Hebert for such amazing photos and making my day just a little more enriched. I have not seen these mice before, learn something new every day! Thanks, Miles!

  11. Angie says:

    Hi I have seen a photo of a field mouse sleeping in a purple tulip b,4 on FB. So cute I love these photos of these little miceys. It must be a lovely experience for you to see nature at its finest. And to capture such an event. With your eyes through your camera. Envy. From Angie ☺

  12. scott says:

    Beautiful. Who painted them?

  13. Wanda says:

    Churning storms make it look like the tie dye planet

  14. Anonymous says:

    and were not united with universe hahaha

  15. Anonymous says:

    That’s some beautiful fake bullshit right there.

  16. Lyn Hoffmann says:

    Yhese are NOT fake – we see clouds just like these in Australia – just because some people haven’t aactually seen them, does not mean they are fake, becaue they are NOT!

best of posts sosyogundem